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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
might be more supportive in the long run of america and the west? >> there is something to that. it is hard to pick and choose, but there is a case for differentiating, of saying, we are going to try to advance certain people in the opposition. we should not kid ourselves even though they use the word coalition. it is not a single unit by any stretch of the imagination, so why don't we look for military and intelligence support for those individuals and groups who can do effective fighting? we think we are more likely to move indirections' we think we can support. there might not be that large a set of people that can fit those criteria. >> how much support you think the u.s. is giving those groups at the moment? >> it is my understanding is fairly modest. it is mostly nonlethal aid. with few exceptions, i do not think the problem facing the opposition is lack of arms. they have captured a lot. there have been some defections, so while they could probably use anti armor and anti helicopter tight arms, they have more than enough. i think it is more the organization and their lead
'll have more from the scene, coming up later today, on "good morning america." >>> we have breaking news now. an overnight manhunt, at cal state fullerton, is over, lasting over 12 hours during the night, after the university went on lockdown. s.w.a.t. teams spent the night looking for two robbery suspects who led police on a wild chase, after holding up a jewelry store and shooting an employee. at least one of the men was spotted in a university building last night. police slowly went door-to-door until giving the all-clear around midnight. during the ordeal, students tweeting pictures from the scene. you could see them in dark classrooms. some using tables and chairs to barricade themselves. the cal state website says things will be back to normal, beginning this morning. >>> well, john mcafee's legal saga has taken another turn this morning. the software pioneer is back in the u.s., after the guatemalan government deported him. mcafee arrived in miami last night and then spoke to reporters from his hotel in south beach. he told abc news that he lost everything in belize, $20 million i
destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is t
know america existed? >> translator: not at all. >> did you know that the world was round? >> translator: i had no idea if it was round or square. >> camp 14 was all that he said he knew for the first 23 years of his life. these satellite images are the only glimpse outsiders have ever gotten of the place. 15 thourk people are believed to be imprisoned here, forced to live and work in this bleak collection of houses, factories, fields, and mines surrounded by an electrified fence. >> growing up, did you ever think about escaping? >> translator: that never crossed my mind. >> it never crossed your mind? >> translator: no, never. what i thought was the society outside the camp would be similar to that inside the camp. >> you thought everybody lived in a prison camp like this? >> translator: yes. >> shin told us this was the house where he was born. his mother and father were prisoners whose marriage, if you could call it that, was arranged by the guards as a reward for hard work. >> did they live together? did they see each other every day? >> translator: no. you can't live
was born there, i just thought those people who carried guns were born to carry guns. did you know, america existed? >> not at all. >> did you know, that the world was round? >> i had no idea if it was round or square. >> camp 14 was all that he knew for the first 23 years of his life. satellite images are the only glimpse that outsiders have had of the place. people live here forced to work in the collection of fac rtorie fields and mines surrounded by the electric fence. >> did you ever think of escaping? >> that never crossed my mind. >> i thought the society outside of the camp was the same as the inside. >> shin told us this is the house where he was born. his mother and father were prisoners, his marriage was arranged by the guards as a reward for hard work. >> did they live together? >> no, you can't live together. they were separated and only when they worked hard could they be together. >> did they love each other? >> i don't know. in my eyes, we were not a family. we were just prisoners. >> how do you mean? >> you wear what you are given and you eat and do what you are told to do.
, text and data for only $45 a month per phone. would we get the same coverage? same coverage on america's best networks. you saved $146.76 by switching to straight talk. awesome! now you can afford to share your allowance with me. get the season's hottest smartphones like the samsung galaxy s2 and get straight talk with unlimited data for just $45 a month -- from america's gift headquarters. walmart. ♪ in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> 29 past the hour. time now to take a look at the "morning papers." we'll start with "the wall street journal." the national counterterrorism center has been given the green light by the white house to examine government files of u.s. citizens for possible criminal behavior. even if they are not suspected of a crime. the u.s. terror -- >> what? >> yeah. i
businesses at a time when we're expecting small businesses to be the engine of job creation in america. ernst & young made it clear if we do what the president is asking for, some 700,000 jobs would be at risk. it's simple as that. >> [inaudible]. >> well, we really shouldn't be. i argued going back to the spring this issue had to be dealt with. that's why in may the house moved a bill to replace the sequester with other cuts in mandatory spending. that is why in july the house passed a bill to expend -- extend all the current tax rates. i've been pushing all year for us to address this problem. but here, we are, at the 11th hour around the president still isn't serious about dealing with this issue right here. it is this issue, spending! now you go back, want to talk about polling, most americans would agree that spending is a much bigger problem than raising taxes. they want us to deal with this in a responsible way. >> problem with congress? my point, whatever the issue is takes this long each year in december to get these things done. >> unfortunately that is the case that we're dealing w
. >> the danish player thought it was funny. isn't it the scorge that is america's hypersensitivity, although it was up ped in a british paper. maybe it is the west. >> you hit the nail on the top of the nail. it is ridiculous, and i think we are the grand central station of politically correct nonsense. where is she from? she is polish or eastern european? they are super non-politically correct there. that's what i love about eastern europe. you know what is great? neither of them said anything about this. a day has gone by and neither has responded. that makes me love serena. she does president president what to get lost in the nonsense. >> by the way, do you think she will say it is racist or just that it is funny. >> the fact that she didn't respond makes me think she is upset if she didn't defend her friend. i would say ninety% of the banter between me and my friends is making fun of each other. >> it makes fun of your stupid velvet jacket. >> you better believe it. and even cultural things that have come from somebody else. they are friends and she is making fun of her and i'm sure sere
that really largely went unnoticed, he said this. "automatically register every eligible voter in america and enable their registration to move when they do." so is this an obvious solution or is this the government going too far? "outfront" tonight, political analyst roland martin and david fromme, senior adviser to president bush. david, i know you've written extensively about this. on its surface, that just sounds terrific. just make it easier for every red-blooded american citizen to be able to vote. but i know you say this is kind of just far too small of a solution. why? >> right. america has a uniquely ram shackle voting. it's injurious to the national pride to hear that brazil does it better, but brazil does it better, and so does mexico. so what i'm disappointed in from the attorney general is there are a lot of problems, he's picked one, it's an important problem. but it also happens to be a problem, the fixing of which would benefit his party. because probably the younger people, the less -- the more mobile people, who would be benefited, would tend to vote democrat. which is f
offices, bank of america, toyota, other companies, too. there's been a class action lawsuit filed against fedex, happened in 2011 and "the wall street journal" says it claims a worker there tried to bring the overcharging up to his superior to let them know this was happening but what's new are the court documents were unsealed this week including these e-mails and in them it shows that this worker wrote this e-mail saying he believes fedex is systematically overcharging customers for residential delivery fees. he said "i have brought this to the attention of many people and no action has been taken to address it." don? >> so don't leave me hanging. what is fedex saying about this? how are they responding? >> fedex is saying the documents they don't tell the entire story, they'll continue to defend the allegations. fedex also noting that customers who have billing issues can get refunds online or call the company. something tells me e-mails aren't going to be enough. plaintiffs will need proof they were overcharged. we'll keep following this and see how all of it plays out. >> appreciate
from europe to north america of the 1937 and they didn't have a full airship, only 36 passengers. at that time in 1937, $400 per ticket, one way, $720 round trip. think of what that would cost in today's parameters. >> no kidding. we'll get answers perhaps on sunday. >>> well before jon stewart and steven colbert, political satire was in the pages of "mad" magazine. >> and now "mad" is celebrating 60 years of poking fun. it's coming up on "world news now." >> announcer: "world ♪ ♪ mad world mad world >>> nice song choice, guys. "mad" magazine is celebrating 60 years of making fun of the american landscape with a brand new book. >> it's called "totally mad -- 60 years of humor, satire, stupidity and stupidity." here to help us celebrate this stupid milestone, can we call it that? not really. "mad" magazine writer, good morning dick bedebartolo. >> let me read this one line. as of his byline in issue 502 in 2009, your material has appeared in 400 consecutive issues of "mad" magazine dating back to 1966, my friend. >> yeah, yeah. >> you are a veteran. >> i've been paid for five
don't think anyone in america is necessarily going hungry. but i think it is morally wrong to create a situation for people that are trapped. ph.d says it is hard to get off the program now, if we make it more enticing h much more difficult will it be to get off the program? melissa: what do you think answer is? >> the answer is a robust economy. melissa: yeah. >> the answer is the economy where we're not looking to divvy up the spoils but create new prosperity for everyone the forget about trickle up or trickle down, grow the pie. grow the pie. not cut it up in little bity pieces. grow it more exponentially the will be more opportunities. melissa: more jobs. >> the message comes along with this, message of victimization. the message that people don't like you. that would help a lot if politicians turn that around say listen, because you get a certain amount of food stamps and not more doesn't mean other people across the other side of town dislike you. i wish the leaders, people who had the ear of a lot of people would take the time to promote a different message but that's not the
'm assuming you're taking a boat and through the americas. one of those, as i'm noticing, the strait line goes right through iran. how do you get through that? >> i think that -- iran straddles an ancient migration path into central asia and ideally it would be wonderful to set off on foot across iran. i'm going toee what relations are like the late 2015, hopefully they're well enough, good enough, to allow me to go through iran. >> sreenivasan: if there's a necessary detour, how long does that take to get around? >> it's a big place to walk around. part of the beauty, i think, of this long project is that there are going to be obstacles that i don't know answers to about how to get around them until i get there. and we'll see. sarin dip city a big part of this project. >> sreenivasan: what are the types of steps you've been taking? you've been planning this for a last couple years. visas? immunizations. what else? >> there's a lot of logistical planning that's gone into getti mainly governments comfortable with somebody walking through their territories. it's an unusual request, as you might
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)